(Fuente: fyspringfield.com, vía jopara)

    leauxcalbelle:

    taylor-sea:

    The progression of video games in a few decades.

    still objectifying women tho

    (Fuente: sonandheirofnothinginparticular, vía itsaliencum)

    taken by Patrick McMullan

    (Fuente: manufactured1987, vía lazhuntiez)

  1. "You cannot use someone else’s fire. You can only use your own. And in order to do that, you must first be willing to believe that you have it."
    Audre Lorde (via adrowningwoman)

    (vía lazhuntiez)

  2. New hair. New ear bling. No playa.

    New hair. New ear bling. No playa.

  3. (Fuente: noirlac, vía luxeposh)

  4. lustnspace:

    Rarely Seen Photos Spotlight The 1970s Social Scene Of South Side Chicago

    (vía racework)

  5. (Fuente: newkidslegacy, vía seyttan)

  6. Bexxx cuts forever. (at Hairrari)

    Bexxx cuts forever. (at Hairrari)

  7. misotrashy:

knitmeapony:

ONE TWEET. THIS FIT IN ONE TWEET. IF YOU FUCK IT UP YOU HAVE NO EXCUSE.

So much of this. An apology is NOT “I’m sorry BUT here’s why I’m totally in the right and think I did nothing wrong.”

    misotrashy:

    knitmeapony:

    ONE TWEET. THIS FIT IN ONE TWEET. IF YOU FUCK IT UP YOU HAVE NO EXCUSE.

    So much of this. 

    An apology is NOT “I’m sorry BUT here’s why I’m totally in the right and think I did nothing wrong.”

    (Fuente: ethiopienne, vía kim-kanye-baby)

  8. krissiikisses:

This book teaches black, Afro-descendent, Afro-Latina, and/or Garifuna girls how to positively describe different hair types instead of using the term “bad hair”. Fun illustrations were created to help describe different types of hair and hairstyles. This book was created to empower little girls so they can embrace and love their beautiful natural hair. This book calls for all of us to work as equal partners to encourage our girls by using proper terminology to describe their hair which is directly linked to their essence and self-esteem. 
@Nopelomalo

    krissiikisses:

    This book teaches black, Afro-descendent, Afro-Latina, and/or Garifuna girls how to positively describe different hair types instead of using the term “bad hair”. Fun illustrations were created to help describe different types of hair and hairstyles. This book was created to empower little girls so they can embrace and love their beautiful natural hair. This book calls for all of us to work as equal partners to encourage our girls by using proper terminology to describe their hair which is directly linked to their essence and self-esteem.

    @Nopelomalo

    (vía wocinsolidarity)

  9. (Fuente: no4mat, vía celestial-beingz)

  10. vthebookworm:

    okayafrica:

    VIDEO:Introducing French Afro-Cuban Twin Sisters Ibeyi & Their Yoruba Doom Soul

    Ibeyi, made up of Cuban-born, Paris-based twin sisters Naomi and Lisa-Kaindé Díaz, is an electronic doom soul duo who are forging a new spiritual sound with their debut EP Oya. The 19-year-old musicians are XL Recordings‘ newest signees, and their introductory singles “Oya” and “River” possess a hypnotic blend of hip-hop, electronica, and blues infused with Yoruba prayers and folk songs that will transport you to a higher realm upon first listen.

    Singing in French, English, Spanish and Yoruba, Ibeyi count among their primary influences Nina Simone, Meshell Ndegeocello, James Blake and their late father, the celebrated Cuban jazz percussionist Miguel “Anga” Diaz. Ibeyi’s vocal range, which wavers from the raspy and wraith-like to the sonorous and divine, is ideal for their sonic palette which revels in the phantasmagorical groove of liturgical Yoruba songs. Besides singing in Yoruba–which was brought to Cuba by West African slaves–Ibeyi honor their father’s legacy and Afro-Cuban heritage through their percussive production and use of live instruments. Beatsmith Naomi plays both the cajón and the batá while Lisa-Kaindé remains more in tune with the musical mythos of Ibeyi’s sound by weaving Yoruba lore deeply into their lyrics. “River” is dedicated to the goddess Oshun (the mother of the Ibeyi, and their first single and EP are both named for  Oya (the benevolent orisha who took the Ibeyi in after Oshun was accused of witchcraft for birthing twins and kicked them out).

    Read More

    I love this so much

    (vía angrywocunited)

  11. Voices: Janay and Ray Rice, Domestic Violence, and the NFL | Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture

    We should be concerned about living in a culture where we routinely disbelieve victims of racism, sexism or domestic violence unless there is video or audio evidence. When we acknowledge the pervasiveness of violence, and of racism and sexism, we will be more responsive to victims and less committed to the kind of dishonesty that greets “isolated” incident after “isolated” incident with shock and surprise.

  12. marleykate:

@wilhelminanmodels ianbradley

    marleykate:

    @wilhelminanmodels ianbradley

    (vía howtobeterrell)

Puertorro. Queer. Farifo. Buscón. UñaRaja. Boridiva. Krikal. Problematica. Mofongo con camarones. Guineitos en escabeche.

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